What Kind of Things Do You Like to Do Outside of Work?

What Kind of Things Do You Like to Do Outside of Work

When an interviewer asks what kind of things do you like to do outside of work, this is a great opportunity for the employer to get some insight into who you are as a person. After all, you are interviewing for a position where you will be spending at least 40 hours a week together. It makes sense that they would want to know what kind of a person they would be working with.

This question should not be difficult. Everyone has different hobbies and interests and sometimes, the unique hobbies are the coolest ones! Just because the person conducting the interview doesn’t play the piano doesn’t mean he doesn’t greatly admire pianists.

Don’t be nervous, and don’t lie! Let them inside of the real you, if even just for this one question.

Mistakes to avoid

When answering what kind of things you like to do outside of work you definitely don’t want to be unprofessional. This doesn’t mean that all of your hobbies have to be work-related. But they shouldn’t be things that could have a negative impact on your work.

For example, if a hobby of yours is that you like to go out on weekdays and party it up at the club, you probably shouldn’t mention this since it could negatively impact your work the next morning. However, saying that you like to enjoy a beer after a long day of work or hang out with some friends is perfectly fine.

Another mistake to avoid is being too vague. Don’t just say,“I love to travel, I like to invest money, I love to cook, I like watching TV, etc.” Give details! Where do you like to travel? Who do you invest money in? What do you cook/favorite foods? What do you watch on TV!?

Now that you are getting close to your interview, make sure you don’t forget the essentials. Check out Preparing For A Job Interview – What To Bring, What To Wear, & More.

Sample answer

“Thanks for asking! I love playing the piano. I am actually in a classical music band called the Classicools and we perform all around town at various venues. We meet up and practice every Saturday at my house. But I also spend a lot of time after work practicing songs or writing new music if I am bored.”

This is just one example. I recommend that you list 2-3 hobbies such as the one above, along with a little story. Provide more information than just saying, “I play the piano.”

You’re all set

Congrats, you are going to kick some bootie in your next interview. I wish you the best of luck and I hope you find your dream job.

If you are still unsure whether or not you are ready for your next interview, check out Find My Profession and ask us about our interview training services.

We would love to help you find your next job and ace your interview!

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