Writing a Professional Introduction Email

Writing a Professional Introduction Email

Managers often write a professional introduction email to their new staff after starting a position. It is an excellent way to digitally open the door and show you are an engaging leader.

If you are a manager or director, we offer these tips to make sure your email is opened (and read). Introducing yourself in an email to staff for the first time must make the proper impression.

Use a welcoming subject line that’s not too spammy

Go to your spam inbox and read the subject lines. You will see a particular style of writing that looks impersonal, fake, and generic. This is hardly the way to introduce yourself in an email.

For your subject line, be engaging, to the point, use your name, and mention your job title. Try this professional email subject line:

  • Introducing: [Your name] | New [your job title]

Do not make demands in an intro email

Imagine how you would feel if you received a professional introduction email from a new manager like this:

  • “Hi, I am your new sales manager. Here is what I expect of you in the first month…[insert demands]”

It happens, unfortunately. Instead of starting off with a list of demands, try introducing yourself in an email by stating:

  • How excited you are to be working together.
  • Offering to speak with staff about suggestions and advice.
  • What you look forward to at the company.

Again, keep it brief. An introduction email should not read as long-winded. Assume your staff is busy and does not have time for long email interactions. You are showing respect for their time.

Proofread and send a test to yourself

Before emailing the entire staff, make sure your grammar is clean. Great Google Chrome plugins like Grammarly are an excellent help.

You are writing a professional introduction email to staff. Typos and poor grammar make your staff question your attention to detail. People often assume a brave, impeccable leader knows how to spell and use clean grammar.

Next, send a test to yourself. Read it out loud to yourself. If you hate the way your email reads, trust your gut instinct and change it.

Use a simple font and size everyone can read

It is best to stick with what works for a professional introduction email:

  • Calibri, Arial, Sans-Serif, or Helvetica

Also, do not make your fonts visible from outer space or only visible through a microscope. Try font sizes 10 to 14.

The main reason for this is because font types and sizes appear different on all devices. Large fonts, or worse, typing in all caps, can knock people out of their chairs. It looks awkward, unprofessional, and a bit like your introduction email is yelling. The last thing you want to do in a professional intro email is yell at them, digitally.

Watch the tone of your email

Does your professional introduction email to staff read like this?

  • “Here I am! Here is what I do!”

Or does it read like this?

  • “There you are! Tell me about yourself.”

Emails using the word “I” too often sound boastful and arrogant. Sure, people want to get to know you in your professional introduction email, but they also want to know you are approachable.

Try cutting down on phrases that state, “What I have done and this is why I am important”. These phrases read too arrogant. Plus, staff already knows you were hired for your past experience.

Instead, focus on statements of this nature, “What we will do together and why each of you are important.” You read humble and willing to work together. Humility is one of the strongest traits that make a leader strong and approachable!

For career advice on what to write when it's time to say goodbye, you can read How to Write Your Formal Letter of Resignation.

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