Write a LinkedIn Message That Gets Read

Write a LinkedIn Message That Gets Read

Sending a LinkedIn message is important especially if you are in the midst of a job hunt. The last thing you want to do is misrepresent yourself or come off as obnoxious and desperate. Using automated messages never works and sending a prewritten template email always looks cold and well...like a template. So, here’s how to write a LinkedIn message that gets read.

1.Be specific in the title

Do not leave people guessing. Ask yourself before you write, “Does this person know me and how? Why am I reaching out to this person and what am I trying to achieve?”

Use your answers to the questions to write a specific subject line in your message. For example:

“Follow-up after meeting at CES conference”

Communicating with text requires clearing up any doubt or questions about who you are and your reason for reaching out.

2. It’s nice to introduce yourself

Never assume the person knows who you are because you have a profile. Recently, the founder of Find My Profession wrote a LinkedIn post that went viral. Many of the folks who messaged the founder directly, introduced themselves and stated they had contacted him due to the post. The messages went something like this:

“My name is [name] and I am the CEO of [company]. I very much enjoyed your post on Ageism and would like to speak with you further about it.”

Whether you use this sentence or not, tailoring your intro for a specific reason shows you have taken an interest in the person you are contacting.

3. Get to the point sooner than later

People are always pressed for time and when it comes to messages, shorter is always better. Skip the drawn-out monologue and string of fancy adverbs and adjectives from a thesaurus. In this case, you show your intelligence with your ability to be brief.

When you craft the core of your message, keep a few things in mind:

  1. Why are you writing?
  2. Why are you connecting?

Now, try a sample sentence along these lines keeping it to one paragraph at most:

“I’m reaching for advice. I’m in the midst of a job hunt and have questions about your service. Can we schedule a time to chat?”

Note: Remember your relationship with this person. Do not ask for a one-hour meeting if you never met the person before, for example. Do not ask for too much if you barely know who you are writing to.

4. Finish up and say “thank you”

Your message should end politely while being clear about what you want. Show some class and grace:

“Would you be open to speaking briefly? I greatly appreciate your expertise. Thank you and I look forward to hearing back from you.”

We find these strategies work whether messaging someone, adding a note in a connection invite, or sending an Inmail.

Does it take a tiny bit longer to write it yourself? Yes. Is it worth the time? Definitely!

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