Why Should We Hire You for This Job?

Why Should We Hire You for This Job?

Whether or not you are specifically asked the question, “Why should we hire you for this job?” in an interview, it is the most important question to address. Whenever an employer chooses to bring you in for an interview, it is the question that is always on an employer’s mind.

The best way to answer  

The best way to answer the question, “Why should we hire you for this job?” is by starting with a list of the attributes that make you stand out from your competition. Some of these attributes might include things such as:

  • Team player
  • Quick learner
  • Organized
  • Good problem solver
  • Customer/Client oriented
  • Good under pressure
  • Personable
  • Great attitude
  • Leadership capabilities
  • Innovative

An average person would simply list out their attributes. However, an above average person would also list where they increased productivity, efficiency and/or performance (also known as PEP). We say that employers want to hire people with “PEP.”

The more specific the evidence you give to support your claim of being “hard-working” or “organized,” the stronger your case will become.  You cannot make a strong case without great evidence, as any great attorney will tell you.

The stronger answer to the question

Here is a stronger answer to the question, “Why should we hire you for this job?” with "PEP":

“Mr. Employer, I am extremely effective at streamlining processes to increase efficiency. In my most recent position, I was able to implement a new billing system that saved our Accounting Manager over five hours of time each week and has helped us to collect an extra $1,000,000 in outstanding accounts receivables.”

Rather than simply saying you that are efficient, you are giving measurable results of where you enhanced efficiencies and increased productivity in a meaningful way.

If the questions never arise

Now that you understand how to effectively answer the question, “Why should we hire you for this job?” how should you handle an interview, if you are not asked that question specifically, but you have a great point that you still want to make?

There is a technique called “blocking and bridging” that I learned from my PR guy when I first started doing TV and radio appearances. The technique is popular among politicians, as well as, actors and actresses when it comes to making a point they want to get across.

They will artfully address the question, and then bridge over to a pre-planned talking point about their political platform or upcoming movie.

Why use this technique in an interview

As I mentioned earlier, the question is on every employer’s mind, whether they ask the question outright or not. By blocking and bridging over to a talking point about why someone should want to hire you, you are making that person’s life easier by proactively sharing reasons to hire you.

An example of blocking and bridging might be something to this effect:

Employer: “How was your drive over here?” (Notice this question has nothing to do about why they should hire you)

Job seeker: “It was great. It reminded me of driving to my first job in XYZ field where I was a little nervous since I did not have industry-specific experience, but by the end of my first week, my manager said I was the quickest learner she had come across. By the end of that first month, I was training other people on our systems.”

As you can see, you start by answering the question and then tie your answer into a pre-planned talking point that will help make a case for why they should want to hire you. Before you ever go into an interview, I recommend having a minimum of three to five talking points prepared to share at different points in the interview.

PEP Guarantees Standing Out

I guarantee you when you are asked, “Why should we hire you for this job?” and you respond with your PEP, you will stand out in a memorable and positive way from your competition.

Note: You can also use PEP when employers ask, ‘Why would I hire you?” or “Convince me to hire you.”

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