Why do I Need a Resume if I Have LinkedIn?

Why do I Need a Resume if I Have LinkedIn?

Although many argue that the resume will be outdated in less than 10 years, and there is plenty of evidence to support this theory, you still need to have both a resume and LinkedIn profile. If you currently know a job seeker and they ask you, “Why do I need a resume if I have a LinkedIn profile?” make sure you stop them in their tracks. Answer with the following advice below.

You still need a well-written resume for applying online

If you have ever applied for jobs online you may notice the importance of having a well-written resume. Resumes are well-written when the format is easy to read and the text within it is tailored to the job you are applying for. Resumes still have to get through applicant tracking systems (ATS) to end up in front of the right person.

LinkedIn is the bigger picture and your resume is not

LinkedIn is a social media platform. Whenever you have something “media” related, how you present things changes to suit larger audiences. Media requires appealing to everyone by being that every day relatable person. But businesses only care what you can do for them, so they do not need the bigger picture.  

Your LinkedIn profile is a big picture of everything you have done in your career. Your resume is just a tailored snapshot of what you want to do for a company. The bigger picture can be appealing to all the people who may want to connect with you.

Your resume needs to be appealing to that one business you want to work with. Therefore, they do not care if you once worked at McDonald’s before you learned to code and started your own business at age 18.

The two together test a job candidate’s consistency

Imagine you apply for a job with a resume you had created for yourself. You maybe fudged a few details, but not to worry because it led to an interview anyway.

Then, after the interview, the hiring manager decides to go on your LinkedIn profile and compares it against your resume. The hiring manager notices some inconsistencies between your resume and LinkedIn profile that raises a few eyebrows. Dates are not matching. Skills do not match and you conveniently forgot to mention that you once worked for the company before and/or their direct competition.

The hiring manager then goes back to thinking about your interview answers. Overall, the hiring manager starts to wonder, “Who did I interview with and can they be trusted?”  Most of the time, they will not ask you to explain away discrepancies because it is easier to make the assessment that the job candidate was not truthful.

Consistency between your resume and LinkedIn profile is highly important. For now, your resume and LinkedIn profile together serve as a way to fact-check for consistency. Therefore, hiring managers and recruiters want to see both are aligned properly. It does not mean they have to be identical. It does mean that what you say on your resume should not lead to any surprises when hiring managers do some vetting through LinkedIn.

LinkedIn contains stories and resumes are about results

A bunch of bullet points with numbers and the three or four things you did at a company is not necessarily a “LinkedIn style”. As a form of media, LinkedIn requires capturing the reader’s attention. You do that with a great story that is also visually appealing.

Resumes, however, are more formal. You want to show quantifiable results and make it a fast-read. When you have an interview the hiring manager will most likely have your resume out to discuss. They already looked up your “story” or will do so after the interview.

So, make sure they are both in order. For the time being, you will need a resume and a LinkedIn profile during your job search.

  • What to Do When You Get Fired

    What to Do When You Get Fired

    People get fired from jobs every day. It happens to the best of us even when it is not your fault. Personality conflicts, new company directions, and simply dropping the ball are all things that happen. If it does, learn what you can do if you get fired, or had been fired in the past, to protect your career growth. Also, read what not to do if you are shown the door.

    Find My Profession by The FMP Contributor
    Read On
  • Advantages of Relocating for a Job

    Advantages of Relocating for a Job

    In the past decade, I have had the opportunity to work with companies from around the world, largely due to technology. Although some of the work was remote at first, there were extended periods of time where relocation was demanded of me. My experiences working in South America and Europe taught me the advantages of relocating for a job.

    Steven Lowell by Steven Lowell
    Read On
  • Avoid Indeed and Use These Job Boards Instead

    Avoid Indeed and Use These Job Boards Instead

    The job board Indeed is one of the most well-known job boards for finding online applications. But there are things about it that should leave job seekers wanting to use other job boards. We explain the reasons to avoid Indeed and the reasons why you should use other job boards or go to the career section of a company website instead.

    Find My Profession by The FMP Contributor
    Read On
See All Articles