Top Tools for an Online Job Search

Top Tools for an Online Job Search

A Google search for “websites with jobs” comes back with over 100 million results. It is a human impossibility to go through that many websites and apply to jobs on each one. You have to know your career stage, what you want, and which job tools are best for an online job search.

Here are some top tools for your online job search.

1. LinkedIn

As of 2018, recruiters, alumni etc. to communicate with while looking for jobs. This also requires have a LinkedIn profile that is properly filled out. More than 94% of recruiters use LinkedIn for screening candidates. And if you are job hunting without a LinkedIn profile, you may as well not exist to employers.

2. Glassdoor

Glassdoor comes complete with salary averages for the job you want, company reviews, information on the interview process, and of course...jobs. This is a great site to research companies before you apply and research the amount of money you should be asking for without under or overpricing yourself.

3. Google

In mid-2017, Google launched its job search engine. It has more filters than other job search sites for narrowing down your search. But, unlike other job sites, Google shows you ALL the websites in which a job listing appears. For example, if you find a job in a Google search, you will see if it appears on LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Indeed, and even the lesser known job websites.

Try it yourself. Do a Google search for Corporate Development Director. Job listings show up as well as the websites they appear on. This has proven to be useful because some job listing websites are just sketchy. They copy content from other sites, pretend to offer original jobs, or spam you with offers of classes and webinars.

Therefore, a Google search for jobs will give you great filters for narrowing searches and teach you what job listing sites you should be avoiding.

4. Career sections of any company website

Have you always had a company you were dying to work for? Go to their website and explore the link titled, “Careers”, that usually appears at the bottom of every company website.

If you apply through a company website, you will most likely have to fill out your data to be entered into the company database. However, this is a good thing given most of these websites will alert you to jobs that match your profile. They may even reach out with other opportunities they think you are a fit for.

5. Indeed.com

You will not find as many higher paying jobs for directors and executives on Indeed. But you will find the jobs that teeter on six-figure salaries. There are plenty of filters to narrow your job search and plenty of jobs to apply for. You will never be short of finding jobs on Indeed. It is also important on this site to make sure your profile and resume are filled out properly, as there tends to be a fairly good amount of communicating with employers and job seekers on Indeed.

6. TheLadders

TheLadders is still one of the strongest sites for finding senior, director, and executive opportunities. The downside is that it is a pay-to-apply resource, but the upside is the exclusivity. You are not applying against thousands of people on TheLadders.

7. ZipRecruiter

finding entry-level work.

About job search tools

The websites above are job search tools that will display opportunities for all industries. During your job search online, make sure you know if the job search tool is specifically geared towards your industry.

For example, websites like Dice are for tech-related job candidates. Do your research on the job search tool to see if it is only showing jobs for your profession. This is important because ALL websites will try to get you to sign up. Signing up for job search tools not related to your profession leads to spam and puts you in a group of job seekers you do not belong to.

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