How to Write Your Formal Letter of Resignation

How to Write Your Formal Letter of Resignation

A new position has come along and the time has come to write your formal letter of resignation. We will show you a polite, classy and professional resignation letter template below and why it is important.

Keep your letter for resignation concise

There is no need to reminisce about the good times or get emotional and creative. This is also not the time or place to take stabs at the company. Instead, stay on topic and let them know the following:

“Dear [insert name],

Please accept this formal letter of resignation from my position as [insert job title]. My last day with the company will officially be [insert date].”

It is a good idea to give your company two weeks notice in your letter for resignation. Give your company a chance to prepare for your departure. It is the right thing to do for your colleagues.

Remember your manners

There is an odd psychology behind saying, “Thank you”. Whether you leave the company for good reasons or not, you should always say, “Thank you”. It shows you are appreciative, not petty, and professional. Try writing something like this:

“Thank you for the opportunity to work in this position. Over the last [insert number of years] I have greatly appreciated the opportunity to work with all of you. I’ve learned [insert valuable lessons you learned], which will stay with me throughout my career.”

The above section of a formal letter of resignation shows that you appreciate the people you work with and the time spent with them. It will leave them hoping to work with you again, one day.

Note how you will help in the job transition

A great career skill to have is knowing how to leave a position while transferring into a new role. Companies with toxic work cultures often inspire employees to leave in negative, dramatic fashion. This is not you. You want to remain professional in your formal letter of resignation. If it is hard for you, just stick to the template offered so far and below:

“In my final two weeks, I will do my very best to make my transition as seamless as possible. I will finish all job duties and train staff to take over for me.

If there is anything you think I need to do in the next two weeks, please let me know how I can help you.

Cheers to your continued success.

Thank you again,

[insert your name]”

The most important thing to remember about your formal letter of resignation is to exit with your head held high. You want to be remembered as a classy, professional colleague. As the saying goes, “Always leave them wanting more.”

Your formal resignation will show everyone that you are a true professional to be missed!

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