Follow up Emails to Make Recruiters Smile

Follow up Emails to Make Recruiters Smile

Your recruiter helped you get an interview. And you are convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that you had the best interview ever. Then, you met with a recruiter who showed lots of interest in staying connected and works with the all the great companies you want to be a part of. And these recruiters all said to you, “Keep in touch”.

But then a couple of weeks pass and you haven’t heard a thing and you haven’t written a thing. You want to write the recruiter. But you also want to leave these recruiters smiling when they read your email.

So, here are some great templates to help you put a smile on a recruiter’s face when you are nervous you may come across as annoying.

1. Follow up with referrals

One of the best ways to make a recruiter smile is to write them with referrals or offer to find referrals for any job they are working on. If you can accelerate their hiring process you will score big with them. Here is an example:

“Dear <insert friend’s name>,

Earlier this month, we had spoken after meeting to discuss [this job]. I was contacting you to see if you had an update or feedback on my interview with [company].

In the meantime, I would happily refer anyone to you. Please let me know. As a job seeker, I know others in my network looking for new work. Maybe I can refer them to you?

It would be my pleasure to assist.

Best wishes,

[name]”

Short and simple. But remember: This type of follow up email should be saved for recruiters you really have a strong desire to work with. This is not the type of email you send to all recruiters because, if you do, you will find yourself making promises to people you cannot keep. And that never goes over well with anyone. You may also end up doing lots of work for people you hardly know.

2. Interview follow up emails

When you follow up with an email after an interview, you may want to offer to connect on other channels such as LinkedIn. You also want to avoid sounding desperate, nervous, needy, or negative. Sure, you had an interview and heard nothing. But there is no reason to assume the worst. Instead, try an email like this:

“Dear <insert recruiter name>,

I recently interviewed for a job opening at <insert company name> for the position of <insert position name> thanks to your recruiting efforts. The position fit perfectly with my experience in <insert experience>, <insert experience> and <insert experience>.

I was writing to see if you had an update and also to invite you to connect with me on LinkedIn. You can learn more about me here on my LinkedIn Profile <insert LinkedIn Profile url>.

I recently followed your posts <insert social media site> and appreciate what you share. You offer valuable resources for job seekers and I like the way you interact with others.

If you have time, I’d love to set up a call and talk. I have some availability on <insert days> next week from <insert time span with time zone>. You can email me at <insert your email address> or by phone at <insert phone number>. I look forward to speaking again soon.

Sincerely,

<insert your  name>”

Give these emails a try the next time you find yourself in similar situations. Job seeking is not easy and you will come across many people and personalities. The emails above will help you network with those recruiters you want to be working with all the time.

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