8 Interview Questions to Discover if You Are a Good Cultural Fit

8 Interview Questions to Discover if You Are a Good Cultural Fit

Finding out you are a good cultural fit for a company is great. It is even better when it happens during the job interview. In order to find what company culture and values you will be dealing with (if hired), try asking these 8 questions. The answers will tell you if there is a positive company culture already in place.

Normally, these types of interview questions would come at the end of the job interview when the job seeker is asked, “Do you have any questions for me?” 

1. How would you describe the work-life balance for this position?

You are finding out if you are a good cultural fit for the work ethic of the company. If you like 9 to 5 jobs and they expect someone to live at the office or on the phone, you will not be a good cultural fit. Some jobs are a traditional “9 to 5” while other jobs are more of a “lifestyle”. If they describe a work-life balance that sounds either too traditional or too busy for you, you run the risk of being criticized for your work ethic.

2. Do you offer training and education to advance throughout the company?

If expanding your skillset, while growing your career, is important to you this is a great question to ask. Some companies hire for a specific set of needs but never choose to grow the employees’ skills, in order to help them advance throughout the company. After a few years, the employee is let go and someone comes in with newer, updated skills.

If you are a person who likes to spend a long period of time with one company while learning many skills to grow your career, you want a company culture and values that believe in having long-term relationships with employees filled with advanced training and education.  

3. What is the best way to describe your company culture and values?

If the hiring manager proudly answers this question quickly, and without stumbling, you can bet there has been work done to create a positive company culture. It takes people and hard work to create company culture and values. It does not happen overnight and all employees must be involved in their own way. If company culture is important to a business they will answer this question with confidence.

4. What kind of employee achievements does the company recognize?

You will discover from this answer if there is a positive company culture of achieving goals and reaching milestones. If you prefer to just “do work” and care not for things like “achievements”, you will not be a good cultural fit for a goal-oriented company.

5. What would you like to change in the company if you could change it right now?

The answer to this question will show you if the company communicates well internally. If you interview with someone who appears to be frustrated, it may be a sign the company culture does not foster or acknowledge how employees feel. Especially, when it comes to discussing how a company can change for the better.

6. Can I work remotely a few days out of the week?

If you prefer virtually working from home, but the company makes it mandatory for you to be in an office, you will not be a good cultural fit. Offices and “virtual offices” appeal to different types of people. Some like rolling out of bed and into the office while others prefer to leave the house and go to work. If you like the answer from the hiring manager to this question, it is a good sign you will fit the company culture and values.

7. What’s your favorite part about working here?

Listen carefully to their answer to this question. If they have nothing nice to say, it may be a sign that the company culture is not a good fit for you. Someone who does not have a “favorite part” of a job is either bored or feels no connection to the company culture and values. See if the hiring manager actually has something nice to say, a positive sign of company culture.

8. Why are you proud of this company?

A company culture that is not proud will usually breed employees who are just collecting paychecks for showing up to work. That is fine if that is what you like.

But if you ask this question and receive a description of the person’s pride in the company, you can bet there is a positive company culture at work. For workers to be proud of a company, they must first have company culture and values to lean on in order to be successful.

Finally

When these questions are over, see if the person you interviewed with appears happy or frustrated. Happiness is a sign they enjoyed talking about a positive company culture. Frustration is a sign they may be tired of the company, so such questions above were quite exhausting to answer.

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