7 Ways to Help You Discover Your Dream Career

7 Ways to Help You Discover Your Dream Career

It is not easy to discover your dream career. It takes a great deal of looking inwards, being honest with yourself, and finding out what is truly the job of your dreams. Even then, do not be surprised if landing your dream job turns out to be the opposite of what you thought was “the job of your dreams”. Discover your dream career in the following ways listed below.

1. Explore not only what you would like to do, but also what you simply find interesting

Have you ever seen a person or a best friend working in a career that you wished you were working in yourself? Sometimes, the way to discover your dream career is to simply try something that looks interesting to you, or even, makes you jealous that someone else can get paid for it. If you have your dream job in sight, then explore it. If something else comes along that sparks your curiosity, explore that one, too. Discover your dream career by going after work you find interesting.

2. Take business classes or courses in a field you find interesting

With the affordability of online education, webinars, and tutorials taking education courses on a new subject is a great way to discover your dream career. Landing your dream job may only be months or a couple of years away if you put in the time to educate yourself. For example, many with no coding ability have gone to schools for coding and started their own businesses, simply because “They want to be their own boss”. Given education often costs money, if you have your dream job now, it is best to keep it while you pay to discover your dream career.

3. Explore what everyone else tells you will be your dream job

Do people tell you that you should be a lawyer because you are great at arguing? Do they ever tell you to be a writer because of what you post on social media? Maybe, they tell you to try being a chef because you cook so well?

It is a good idea to look into something that others see could be your dream job. You may wrestle with the fact that someone else helped you discover your dream career, but that is just pride getting in the way of happiness. If you do something that makes people think, “I would pay you for that!”, look into it. They may see something in you that you did not discover, yet.

4. Explore and expand on what you have now in your dream job

While working in your dream job, or if you work in a unfulfilling job now, there will be the side tasks you are asked to do that have nothing to do with your job title. For example, if you happen to help people with their computer problems around the office and discover that you have a knack for setting up systems or procedures...but all you are is a marketing associate. Explore the possibilities of working with computers, project management, or operations management.  Do not worry about being a jack-of-all-trades. You can set up a resume for each skill set you have while trying to discover your dream career.

5. Explore what your boss will not let you do at work

I firmly believe the rise of entrepreneurship in the United States, which means trading in a 40-hour work week for 80 hours, happened because of bosses who made employees stick to assigned tasks.  The Internet gave people around the world a chance to educate themselves faster in their free time.

So, when they went to work and were stopped by a boss from doing anything more than assigned job duties they said, “Forget what you think. I know I can do more.” Although entrepreneurs may work longer hours than most, they discovered dream careers for themselves by exploring what the boss would not let them do.

In 2015, a US Labor Statistics survey showed more than 50 million Americans were working as freelancers, earning income outside of the traditional 9-to-5 job.

6. Explore what you like to do on weekends

Yes, the job of your dreams just might be calling you on weekends. You can discover your dream career by exploring those things you do on weekends. For example, yard work, cleaning up around the house, playing fantasy football, or simply writing a blog.

You can discover your dream career by investing time in seeing how these things would translate into landing your dream job. You can start contracting businesses, websites, and even pursue a writing career. Your very hobbies are things you are good at, but to get paid is a different story. Explore how far your hobbies can take you.  

7. Come to a decision on what will be your “legacy”

To discover your dream career, start by answering this question and then writing down your answer somewhere:

  • “When you retire, what will the world remember most about your career?”

I have met many web entrepreneurs, lawyers, politicians, celebrities etc. over the years. Many had expressed to me, “I want to be known as someone who changed the world and made it a better place”. This author, at one point, wanted to be remembered for “making [a particular industry] much nicer and fair to everyone”. I discovered my dream career by discovering what I wanted to be my “legacy”; to help people find their dream careers.

What will be your legacy? It may just hold the clues to landing your dream job. It takes work and patience, but your legacy is a lifetime commitment, so it is worth the effort.

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