7 Easy and Essential Interviewing Tips for Job Seekers

7 Easy and Essential Interviewing Tips for Job Seekers

After ten years of recruiting on the agency side, I would like to start with some basic interviewing and resume tips.

Often a recruiter might counsel or recommend these tips to their candidates, but with the pace of things today, these basics can get overlooked.

1. Keep your resume up to date

I suggest showing your resume to a few people for feedback to make sure it truly highlights your strengths.

Please do not be afraid to "toot your horn" on your resume.

  • It shows confidence.
  • It lets you stand out among the other candidates. 

Also, in my opinion, chronological resumes are the way to go.

Functional resumes are considered not acceptable to many hiring managers.

In fact, I have seen these resumes declined over and over again.

It seems that managers feel someone is trying to hide something by using a functional resume.

(Check out What To Include In A Resume - 16 Best Things.)

2. Take extra copies of your resume to the interview

I still have managers tell me the candidate did not bring a copy of their resume with them, much less extra copies.

Please think about your potential audience.

While this may not apply in every situation, I think it is best to be conservative here and bring a few copies.

It is also nice to have one for you to look at so when they ask questions, referring to your resume, you can glance down and be prompted by the details in front of you.

3. Arrive 10-15 minutes early

Arriving early will give you a moment to breathe and reflect before an interview as well as not feel rushed.

But please do not arrive 30 minutes before an interview.

If you do, I would recommend sitting in your car for a few minutes.

The last thing you would want to do is stress out your interviewer by arriving too early.

4. Research the company before an interview

It is ideal to learn about the company where you will be interviewing.

As a recruiter, I constantly have hiring managers telling me about candidates who reveal that they do not even know what the company does.

Try to do a little homework beforehand and it will pay off big time.

5. Be prepared with a couple of questions

Having a few questions after the interview will help confirm your interest in the position.

Plan a few questions in advance.

(Need additional help preparing questions for your interview? See Do You Have Any Questions For Me.)

6. Thank the interviewers for their time

Make sure to thank the interviewer at the end of the interview.

Also, state that you are interested in and excited about the job.

I frequently hear situations where the manager is unsure whether the candidate even wants the job after an interview.

That is definitely not how you want to come across.

7. Treat everyone you meet with respect

It’s always important to treat everybody with respect, but when it comes to interviews, you better bring your A-game.

You never know what sort of influence any given person could have.

And it's just a great way to go through your days respecting others. 

Closing thoughts

All the best in acing your next interview!

If you need some extra help in your job search, here at Find My Profession, we offer the legendary career finder service.

Contact us today and find out how we can help you land your dream job.

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