3 Absolutely Wrong Ways to Quit a Job

3 Absolutely Wrong Ways to Quit a Job

We live in an interesting time. Social media posts, publicity stunts, social movements, and viral videos can earn a person instant fame overnight by doing something outrageous to quit a job. However, it is important to remember that you should never get carried away by these actions.

Just because someone else seemed to gain positive attention on social media, do not start incorporating such actions into your professional life. There are better ways to settle professional disputes.  

This blog may seem like common sense to many, but unfortunately, it still needs to be written. Here are 3 absolutely wrong ways to quit a job that will affect your business relationships in the future. In some cases, it may kill your career in an industry.

First things first

Before you think about quitting using the methods below, remember time has proven that doing so is always a bad idea. Never quit as a spur of the moment decision. Take 24 hours and return to work to make sure the way you felt yesterday wasn’t just a bad day.

If you do quit, make sure you do it with a cool head always maintaining a professional attitude. Unemployment lines are filled with working-class heroes who "kept it real" and paid for it.

3. Quitting by announcing it on a blog or social media

Without a doubt, you will find sympathizers on social media if you start complaining about why your boss is treating you poorly. Social media is a great support group, but if you think anyone who “likes” and shares your social posts will hire you for quitting in an unprofessional manner, think twice. See actual Twitter post below:

Taking your professional issues and making them public is the sure-fire way to let every company know, “Do not trust this person. Dangerous to any company’s reputation”.  What many forget while taking their personal issues to social media is that “media” is still a form of entertainment.

In entertainment, we cheer on our heroes but media is just the performance of real life. The reality is making a public spectacle of your work problems will cost you your job, and more than likely, jobs in the future. And you don’t want a social media footprint you cannot have 100% control over.

2. Falling off the planet (ie. Stop showing up to work)

People who had tried this one in the past detonated a bridge at their previous jobs for the following reasons:

They were not upfront about their intentions to leave.

They may have earned one last paycheck they did not work for, as they never officially quit.

They appeared cowardly.

Most importantly, for those who cared about the person’s well-being, the staff at the office was left wondering if the person was still alive.

We live in a digitally connected world where we feel little human connection to our obligations to people. Business loyalty seems to be a thing of the past. We are 89% more likely to be loyal to a brand, rather than our job.

Loyalty or not, when a company commits to paying you there is an obligation to let them know when they should stop paying you.

1. Making a dramatic and angry exit

You may feel so upset that you want to finally give your boss a piece of your mind. You want to be a modern-day working class hero and let everyone know just how unfair the company was to everyone.

But have you really thought this through? Take inventory of the real reasons behind you quitting. It may be a personality conflict or poor decision-making on your part. You may have every right to be upset. Still, don’t do it.

Why? Not all the relationships in your company were bad. They would have fired you or never hired you. But if you quit this way, you are saying goodbye to all of the relationships and this made your time at the company a complete waste.

The hardest thing to do

It may be tough at times to think this way, but there are more rewards in being accountable for your decision to work somewhere than rewards for destroying something positive you built in a fit of rage to feel some sort of short-term justice.

Ultimately, this is a decision in your career where you do not realize exactly why it is a bad decision until you really want a job and lose it; all because of the way you quit a previous job.

No one can see beyond choices they haven’t made, yet. But quitting by burning bridges has a 100% failure rate.

  • Describe a Situation in Which You Led a Team

    Describe a Situation in Which You Led a Team

    This question is your opportunity to give a real-world example. You're going to describe a situation in which you led a team, give an example of leadership experience, show how you manage and show your impact on an organization. This also means discussing results. An employer is trying to gauge a few different things with this question.

    Jasmine Briggs by Jasmine Briggs
    Read On
  • Advantages of Relocating for a Job

    Advantages of Relocating for a Job

    In the past decade, I have had the opportunity to work with companies from around the world, largely due to technology. Although some of the work was remote at first, there were extended periods of time where relocation was demanded of me. My experiences working in South America and Europe taught me the advantages of relocating for a job.

    Steven Lowell by Steven Lowell
    Read On
  • EEO Questions - Everything You Need to Know

    EEO Questions - Everything You Need to Know

    The EEOC or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is an agency of the federal government, created by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). The purpose of EEOC is to interpret and enforce federal laws prohibiting discrimination. What are EEO questions? EEO (Equal Employment Opportunity) questions are most commonly found on job applications.

    Find My Profession by The FMP Contributor
    Read On
See All Articles