10 Appropriate Questions to Ask During an Interview

10 Appropriate Questions to Ask During an Interview

One of the most awkward moments of a job interview is at the conclusion of an interview when the hiring manager asks, “Do you have any questions for me?” They have been asking you questions, and now you have to ask them?

You really want to ask, “When do I start?”, especially if you REALLY want the position, but that cannot happen. So, if you are not sure how to end an interview, do not say, “Thanks!” and walk out. Try these three appropriate questions to ask during an interview.

1.  What would your employees say is the best part about working here?

This is an appropriate question to ask during an interview because it helps you see if the company listens to their employees. You also get to hear what the company perceives their employee's value. Also, interview questions at the end are not made to put the hiring manager on the spot, but if you see the question is difficult to answer, it could be a sign of trouble.

2. How will my performance be measured at this company?

One of the worst things to happen is to accept a job where your performance is not measured. This leads to disagreements between employees and management over “who is working harder to achieve success”. Having performance measured also gives everyone in a company a sense of purpose and value to a company.

3. Will I be hired to implement or follow strategies?

This is an appropriate question to ask during an interview because anyone looking for a director, senior, VP, or CEO position is usually at a stage in their careers where they “build”. This interview question is designed to find out if they want to hire a leader or a follower.

4. Who are your main competitors?

Ask this appropriate question during an interview to see if the company is aware of their own market. You will also get a sense of how competitive the company is by their answer. Aside, you may also find out other companies you may wish to apply for if this one does not work out.

5. What is your favorite part about working here?

At the conclusion of an interview, you should be able to say to yourself, “The people in this company seem happy to work here. That is a good sign.”

6. How big is the team I will be working with?

This is simply an appropriate question to ask during an interview because you may be a leader that prefers small teams. Not everyone is meant to manage large teams. You will also get a good idea of the workload ahead and if they are giving you sufficient resources to work with.

7. What do you see as the most challenging task in my position?

When they called you in for the interview, they had something in mind that led to start thinking, “This is the person we need!” Ask this question and at the conclusion of an interview, you will know exactly what they see in you and the challenges you will face.

8. How would you describe your own company culture?

Over the last decade, company culture has become more and more important. By the conclusion of an interview, their answer will give you an idea if the company’s morals and ethics are aligned with your own. If the company’s answer disturbs you, it’s best to pass on the job.

9. What have past employees done to succeed in this position?

This is a simple and great question to ask at the conclusion of an interview. You are discovering what the company defines as “achieving success”.

10. If you hired me today, what would you expect of me in my first week?

What makes this an appropriate question to ask during an interview is the fact you are seeing if they already have plans for you, or you are seeing if this company needs you to come in and figure things out as you go.

Some like to have a set path ahead of them and others like to pave their own roads. You are finding out what type of road this company will take you on.

Be sure to reach out to Find My Profession for interview prep services to help you answer interview questions at the end with confidence.

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